Month: June 2014

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Pirate Radio, YouTubers And Video Games


Brilliant article by Tadhg Kelly. The question remains, if YouTubers should really be paying game developers for using their content? Well they are earning a potential 4m/year doing humorous game walkthroughs. How harmful is that?

It’s just another business model created from the games industry, just like development, design, publishing, brokering, licensing, etc. Everybody wants a piece of that small pie, and now when the industry extends to the use of games within the branded content segment, it goes back to the stone age of copyright infringement, as the best source to earn money? Come on!

They forget that some of these creators of content, are not being watched because of the games, but the delivery of the content by the creators themselves. In that case, shouldn’t they be doing these developers a service instead? Some of the games or horrendous, in fact I don’t understand how they even make it on STEAM to be honest.

If you have a say this, re-blog this and share your view.

TechCrunch

Editor’s note: Tadhg Kelly writes a regular column about all things video game for TechCrunch. He is a games industry consultant, freelance designer and the creator of leading design blog What Games Are. You can follow him on Twitter here.

PewDiePie, TotalBiscuit, Vegetta Gaymer, TheDiamondMineCar, VanossGaming. These and many more represent the new frontier of gaming media. They are “YouTubers”, channels on YouTube that record lengthy (known as “Let’s Play”) gameplay videos and use them as footage for episodic, usually comedic, shows.

YouTubing (and similar through services like Twitch) has been gaining momentum for a while, but this year it seems to have broken through into the wider consciousness. Some channels have attained enormous followings and are starting to exert huge influence. Many indie developers report, for example, that YouTubing is far more successful in driving sales than the traditional PR/press machine. Many attribute the initial flocking of users…

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Nvidia thinks ARM is ready for the high performance computing market


This is the first step forward in computing to deconstruct how processors are even designed today. I was recently at a computer store looking for a new graphics card. I came across the AMD Radeon series, it cost half a lung, and best part was the salesperson told me that I needed to remove the entire casing because it gets super hot! like how helpful is that?

So this also leads me up to the point of energy conservation. We tend to forget that these machines we build outputs heat. Coolers are needed to dissipate the heat in order to achieve optimized results, in return more power cycles are needed to deliver this result. Ending in bigger server farms, cooling facilities and not to mention a rising electrical bill at home.

ARM is it? Let’s see what you got…

Gigaom

Three computer makers have decided to combine Nvidia graphics processors with ARM-based CPU cores for high performance computing — a first for the ARM architecture that has so far dominated the cell phone market. Cirrascale (pictured above), E4 and Eurotech are all building machines that will use the Applied Micro X-Gene boards in conjunction with a nearby GPU to handle the types of performance-heavy workloads popular in the oil and gas, scientific and industrial design industries.

Nvidia has opened up its CUDA code that lets developers compile their code to run on GPUs as a means to get ARM cores into the HPC sector. The combination of a GPU and an Intel x86 processor has become more common in supercomputing, in part because GPUs can do more work per watt than an x86 processor. As supercomputers grow in performance, they are also sucking up far too much energy, leading experts…

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